Be ready to care for your best friend in a disaster situation.

Food - a reserve for 2 weeks of the food your dog is used to eating: one-serving cans with can opener. Store food in airtight, waterproof container and rotate every 3 months. Feeding and water dishes; spoon for mixing food.

Water - enough for two weeks. Store in dark, cool location. Rotate it out of storage so it remains fresh every month.

Sanitation - Use a pooper scooper and plastic bags to dispose of waste. You can purchase disposable pooper scooper bags from the pet supply store.

Cleaning supplies - Get liquid dish soap for food bowls and paper towels (at least four rolls) for clean up. Buy disinfectant for cleaning the cage or crate your dog(s) will be in.

Collar and Tag - proper fitting collar with ID tag needs to be on your dog at all times. Get extra ones for your emergency supply in case it gets lost or broken. Do not use choke collars for ID as it could get caught by accident and choke your dog. Use spare IDs that you can write on to put temporary addresses and phone numbers, if staying somewhere. Put a harness and a 6 ft. leash in supplies - your dog is less likely to slip out of a harness during stressful times. In addition, microchip or tatoo.

First Aid Kit - get a first aide book and check with your vet as to supplies. See the article on First Aid Supplies. Make sure you include a proper fitting muzzle as even the friendliest dog will bite if it is hurt and in pain.

Medications - Have a two week supply if your dog is on long term medication because you won't be able to refill the prescription. Keep a copy of your dog's medical and vaccination records with your Emergency supplies and keep them currant. Include a Bordetella Vaccination. Check and see if your vet has a disaster plan. If not, find one.

Confining Dog temporarily - Purchase large airline crates or wire collapsible cages for transportation during an evacuation; room enough for food and water and for dog to lie down confortably. (Fences and walls will come down during a disaster, offering escape). YOU may want to purchase metal screw stakes with a chain for outside. Make sure you provide protection from hot sun, extreme cold, snow, rain, etc. Dog houses are good. Make sure no aggressive dog can get to them or a wall or building could fall on them or any place where the animal could fall and hang itself or drown.

Pictures - Have current pictures of you with your dog(s) for ID in case the dog(s) get lost.

Phone: 864-834-1313
Email: sharon@caninesncats.com

"Visiting a [shelter] is a grueling experience - all those desperate creatures clamouring for attention. For the tender-hearted it is not hard to come away with a whole pack."
– Jilly Cooper, Mongrel Magic